Mississippi’s Parchman Prison Farm Needs to be Shut Down

I’ve studied over a century of brutality at this prison farm in Sunflower County. I’ve realized that the only way this place will be made constitutional is to shut it down and start over. The reforms began by the federal courts in the 1970s are a memory of the past, as the state of Mississippi continues to neglect its prisons.

[The] Prison has always been violent,” he said. “It’s like walking into a zone with a bunch of time bombs waiting to explode. . . . If you’re being treated like you’re nothing, like you’re a dog, an animal, and you’re not getting the right amount of food, water, you don’t have no way to use the restroom, the frustration constantly builds.

Same story, different era.

Thanks, Liliana Segura, “People Keep Dying in Mississippi Prisons but the Governor Wants to Move On.”

First Maine inmate to enroll in graduate school conducts groundbreaking research in prison

His thesis work is groundbreaking in that it may be the first instance of institutional-review-board-approved, inmate-on-inmate research. Brown will be interviewing inmates and looking for themes in the stories they tell about themselves in an attempt to understand the impact of stereotype, stigma, shame and humiliation on prisoner self-narratives and to determine whether these are barriers to reintegration into society.

Hopefully, this trend continues. Who better to tell the outside world about prison culture than prisoners themselves? 

Thanks, Portland Phoenix.

Hello again.

Hi there. I hope all is well. I am continuing the discussion I began back in 2013. Many things have happened in my life and career during that time. Even more, much has happened in the realm of the American carceral state. Some good, some bad, but mostly the same. I’d like to refer you to the very first post I made for this blog back in 2013 because most of those sentiments are the same. Scholars need to continue uncovering the history of incarceration, peeling away the layers to reveal the core of the matter.

I hope to help peel away those layers by sharing my own research as well as that of my colleagues in history, law, and other disciplines. Enjoy the ride!

San Francisco Jail Portraits and Audio Interviews, by Robert Gumpert, on Show in the Bay Area

Prison Photography

Gumpert

Photographer, friend and fellow San Franciscoer Robert Gumpert will be exhibiting at St. Mary’s College in Moraga, California from January 25th to March 15th.

On show will be photographs from two projects — Gumpert’s ongoing Take A Picture, Tell A Story, and images from “I Need Some Deodorant. My Skin Is Getting Restless” which were made between 1996 and 2002 at the Alameda County’s Psychiatric Emergency Services at John George, Oakland. In both bodies of work, Gumpert uses oral history (audio and text interviews) to add description, depth and context to the experiences of his subjects.

If you’re in the Bay Area, I strongly recommend a trip through the Caldecott Tunnel out to Moraga.I’ve long been an admirer of Gumpert’s work, specifically Take A Picture, Tell A Story which is part of my curated effort Prison Obscura.

Prior to the public reception on January 25th, will be an hour long panel discussion…

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Reducing Prison Population DOES Reduce Crime

From Nicole Flatow of ThinkProgress:

The report bolsters the notion that locking up the wrong people doesn’t improve public safety. In fact, “smart on crime” policies not only minimize punishment toward non-violent offenders; they can also re-allocate resources toward violent crime.

No big surprise here. The “tough on crime” policies of the 70s don’t work.

Every Graph, Stat and Data Point You Need For Research on U.S. Mass Incarceration

Prison Photography

regional_rates_1978-2010

For the last 30 years, there have been clear regional differences in states’ use of the prison, with the southern states relying on the prison the most often. (See larger.)

The small, independent and incredibly effective Prison Policy Initiative (PPI) has delivered us a great service once more.

Not content with *only* filing lawsuits, pressing states to move away from Prison Based Election Gerrymandering; battling corrupt and expensive jail phone systems; and protecting prisoners’ rights to communicate unhindered by letter, PPI is committed to providing fellow prison reformers with accurate up-to-date data on mass incarceration. We cannot rely on the governmet to provide recent data.

“Until 2006, researchers, advocates, and policymakers could rely on state-level race and ethnicity incarceration rate data from the Bureau of Justice Statistics “Prisons and Jails at Midyear” series. Unfortunately, these state-level statistics have not been updated in eight years,” says PPI.

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